The Works of Patricia Lynne

Being Human

Tommy forgot his human life when he became a vampire…but it didn’t forget him.

Like all vampires, Tommy must do one thing: survive. With no memory of his life before death, his only connection to humanity is his twin brother. When Tommy rescues a young girl, he learns not all monsters are undead. After returning her to her family, Tommy struggles to understand why he felt so protective of her when she has no connection to him.

As the years pass, and with his twin’s help, Tommy moves on with his ‘life’ but never forgets the young girl or the monster who hurt her. When she re-enters his life as a teenager, Tommy struggles with his vampire need to survive and his desire to protect her. He will be forced to decide which part of him is stronger: The vampire? Or the human? The answer may destroy him.

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Snapshots

Cyclop can see other people’s futures, but his own is clouded by a past he can’t escape and a man he calls Master.

It’s not Cyclop’s albino skin and mismatched eyes that make him stand out, but his ability to see the future and a dark past he escaped. Only those close to him know his secrets, and with their help, he has carved out a normal life. But his past refuses to let him go, and when the man he calls Master finds him, he is forced to return to his old life.

Imprisoned, Cyclop clings to the hope of freedom. To do so, he must break Master’s control over him. Will he find the strength to become the master of his own life? Or is his past destined to be his future?

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Leaves of Fall

Armory was raised to hate nature, but not all trees wanted a war.

Armory was born in a world torn apart by the war between man and nature. The threat of another attack looms over Armory and the survivors hidden in the remains of New York City. When Armory is kidnapped, a tree nymph is her unlikely savior.

Birch claims he can return Armory safely home. Can she trust a tree? If she wants to see her home again, she has no choice. As they travel across the wasteland of America, Armory meets both humans and trees who want the fighting to stop.

But the hatred between man and nature may be too deep of a wound to heal. In a world destroyed by hate, can Armory and Birch’s friendship change minds and forge peace? Birch has a plan to make it happen. He’s just not sure he’ll survive.

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About Patricia

Patricia never set out to become a writer, and in fact, she never considered it an option during high school and college. She was more of an art and band geek. Some stories are meant to be told, and now she can’t stop writing. Her young adult stories often have a paranormal, fantasy or sci-fi twist.

Patricia lives with her husband in Michigan, hopes one day to have what will resemble a small petting zoo, and has a fondness for dying her hair the colors of the rainbow. She also writes New Adult Urban Fantasy and Sci-Fi Romance under the name Patricia Josephine.

WHERE TO FIND HER

WEBSITE | GOODREADS | AMAZON | FACEBOOK

JOIN HER FACEBOOK GROUP

Guest Post: Sherry Ellis

Bubba and Squirt’s Mayan Adventure

By

Sherry Ellis

Print ISBN 9781939844750
EBook ISBN 9781939844712
Juvenile Fiction – Action Adventure/Legends, Myths, Fables-Caribbean & Latin American

About the Book

An ancient Mayan civilization!

That’s what Bubba and Squirt find when they travel through the mysterious vortex for another wild adventure. There they meet archeologists who are unearthing priceless artifacts.

But someone is stealing them. And an encounter with the Tate Duende awakens magic within Bubba. Throw in the mysterious Alux and a new discovery and things get sticky.

Will Bubba and Squirt solve the mystery, or will they be stuck forever in the jungles of Belize?

Q&A With Sherry

What about Mayan Culture drew you in?

About twenty years ago, when I was an avid SCUBA diver, I went on several dive vacations—many to places in Mexico and Central America. When I wasn’t diving, I took side trips and visited ancient Mayan ruins, such as Chitzen Itza, Tulum, and Altun Ha. Naturally, seeing these places made me want to learn more about them and the people who built them.

What surprised you?

Have you ever seen Mayan artwork? Many of the people are depicted with flat heads. I thought the artists were using artistic license to make people look that way. It surprised me to learn that those flat heads were real. The ancient Maya strapped boards to babies’ heads for six years to get them to look like that. I’m sure glad we don’t do that today!

IWSG 74: Well, I Learned Something New


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This post was written for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group where we share our encouragement or insecurities on the first Wednesday of the month, to join the group or find out more click here.

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Co-Hosts

Susan Baury Rouchard | Nancy Gideon | Jennifer Lane | Jennifer Hawes | Chemist Ken  | Chrys Fey

Quote:

“Although I have written a short story collection, the form found me and not the other way around. Don’t write short stories, novels or poems. Just write your truth and your stories will mold into the shapes they need to be.”

 Note: If you know, please, tell me who said this. I would like to give them credit where credit is due.

OPTIONAL IWSG DAY QUESTION:

Have you ever written a piece that became a form, or even a genre, you hadn’t planned on writing in? Or do you choose a form/genre in advance?

Honestly, I didn’t know I wrote speculative fiction until someone told me. Then I said, “Nah, I write fantasy, some sci-fi and a touch of horror. All of them with a murrrrderrrrr.”

Well, didn’t my face turn red when I looked up spec fic and discovered they nailed it and I was a silly ignoramus.

So living life, I learn a few things. It’s okay with me. I just feel a little bad about how I treat the people that teach me my lessons. Sometimes I wish I listened more, or would just “Shut it!”—if you know what I mean.

Thanks for excusing me last month and as Tobey MaGuire said in Spider-Man:

“I’m back, I’m back… Oh my back, my back.”

Now, that’s a quote. hehehe

What about you, ever learn anything from someone sharing a random thought? Where did it take you? I’d love to know. 🙂

Skipping this month.

Sorry all, but due to an injury, I’ll be taking the month off.

See you in August.

Toolbox 31: Let Me Introduce You to The Inspector

This post was written for the Author Toolbox Blog Hop where we share our new discoveries on the craft of writing, editing, querying, marketing, publishing, and blogging tips. Posted every third Wednesday of the month. For rules and sign-up click here.

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As most of you know, I use and love Scrivener. Mostly because helps me organize my work. But I also use The Inspector specifically for tracking what I’ve written. It is versatile.

Here’s what I do to fine tune The inspector.

You’d find The Inspector on the right side of the window. It can be turned on/off by clicking on the big i in the blue circle.

It’s broken down into sections: Synopsis, General Meta-Data + the bottom section that changes depending on what button is highlighted at the top.

Synopsis:

Is a perfect place to write a logline for each chapter or a slice of your outline. 😉

General Meta-Data:

  • Label: I tend to use this to follow my plot (& subplots), or on occasion POV characters. The color can be changed for each label, so that a quick look in The Binder (possibly another post) tells you where you’re heavy.
  • Status: On The Corkboard, I can easily see how close my project is to completion. Some status choices are: 1st draft, 2nd draft, before beta read, after beta, polished + notes only.

Note: Both, Label and Status, and their subtitles are edited through a separate window. To open it, click on the drop-down menu to the right of either Label or Status then click on edit.

  • The last three refer to the act of collecting and printing the WIP.
    • Include in Compile: Tick the box if you wish to include the scene in your printed project.
    • Page Break Before: Tick the box if you want to insert a page break before a chapter/scene.
    • Compile As-Is: In the compile section you can change the project’s formatting, however, if you prefer to format as you go tick this box.

The bottom section is controlled by the buttons at the top.

Right to left: Document Notes, Document References, Keywords, Custom Meta-Data, Snapshots, and Comments + Footnotes.

Document Notes (Project Notes):

When selected, there is a drop-down menu and you may choose between either Project Notes and Document Notes.

If it is not obvious, comments noted on the Project Notes can be accessed from anywhere within the project. Any notes on the Document Notes can only be accessed when on the associated page.

I think of this as my fix-it-later place. Learned this from NaNo, when I don’t want to stop and don’t want to forget what I’ll need to change later. I’m sure you’ve been there. 😉

Document References (Project References):

Again you have the choice of a Document References or Project References from the drop-down menu. Further a long is a ‘+’ with a downward arrow to add an item  and a ‘-‘ to remove an item.

The choices are:

  1. Add Internal Reference: creates a link to another part of your project.
  2. Look Up + Add External Reference: creates a link to a file somewhere on your computer.
  3. Create External Reference: creates a link to a website.

Keywords:

No doubt you know how versatile keywords can be. Assign them to clues, characters, settings, or whatever you’d like.

You can add ‘+’, remove ‘-‘, or access all the Keywords within the project with the ‘gear wheel’.

Clicking on the gear wheel lets, you organize them within a hierarchy.

I assign a heading of characters, settings, items, clues and list the actual names of each underneath.

I tend to drag and drop them from the big list as I need them.

Custom Meta-Data:

At first glance it’s an empty space. You’ll want to change that. To the very right is a gear wheel. Click it and it opens the same window as before. You should see tabs: Label, Status, Custom Meta-Data, and Project Properties.

Once the window is open you can make a checklist of things you want to track using the ‘+’, ‘-‘. The up-arrow, and a down-arrow can move your list around.

What do you want to track? Timelines, Emotional level 1-5, Setting tags. It can be almost anything. For longer answers click the word-wrap button. If you like colors… Well, I think you know what to do.

Here’s my list.

If it’s not obvious, you fill in the blanks with your answers.

The Project Properties Tab:

Is where you can add your name, the project title, etc. This is primarily used when compiling. The entries are used in the header/footer of the resulting document.

Snapshots:

Snapshots is another fave of mine. A quick back-up of any scene. Click the ‘+’ and an exact copy is made. Each is saved with a date & time as well as a title. Don’t like how the revision went and want to start again. Rollback and its as if you didn’t do a thing.

I use this (along with Status) to track what I’ve done so far. Some titles of my Snapshots are: 1st Draft, Revision #, After Beta Read, etc.

Comments + Footnotes:

Comments + Footnotes are more for Non-Fiction. I rarely use them unless I want to check a fact in a sentence. Like I said sucky memory.

I’m hoping with the headings that you only hopped around the post. It’s much longer than my usual. Don’t mean to bore you, but hey, Scrivener is jam packed with possibilities.

Thanks for dropping by. If you have any questions, I’ll gladly share.