Category Archives: Meme

Meeting like minds is so refreshing. I so this just for fun.

IWSG 84: A Change is as Good as a Rest


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This post was written for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group where we share our encouragement or insecurities on the first Wednesday of the month, to join the group or find out more click here.

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co-hosts

J Lenni Dorner | Sarah FosterNatalie Aguirre | Lee Lowery | Rachna Chhabria

OPTIONAL IWSG DAY QUESTION:

For how long do you shelve your first draft, before reading it and re-drafting? Is this dependent on your writing experience and the number of stories/books under your belt?

Answer to question one: It depends.

I have a few questions too: What if finishing your story amps you up? What do you do then?Well, I suggest writing something new to help you break free from your old story. Make it a short one.

I love writing shorts. I can revise over a weekend. There is so much freedom with something you can read in an afternoon. Feedback is easier to get too.

Once you finish it, you’ll be more than ready for your revisions.

Answer to question two: Experience allows me to see my writing growth. I get a little better.

Some more wisdom is that we should remind ourselves that we succeeded. Accomplished something only a few of the 7.9 billion humans on Earth are capable of doing.

Revising will be harder than getting our first draft down. No one likes the truth when it hurts. If you land up just rephrasing what you already have then, it’s done.

Or, and this sucks, it’s time to drop it in a drawer and forget about it.

Let your beta readers tell you where it stands and move on to the next masterpiece waiting to be captured.

What about you? Do you start something new right away or do you distract yourself with another hobby?

ADDITIONAL NOTE:

On several occasions I tried to return the comment and was rejected. I don’t know why, but I’d like you to know I return all comments when I can. Sorry if I missed you.

 

IWSG 83: TO BE CLEAR


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This post was written for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group where we share our encouragement or insecurities on the first Wednesday of the month, to join the group or find out more click here.

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co-hosts

Erika Beebe | PJ Colando | Tonja Drecker | Sadira Stone | Cathrina Constantine

OPTIONAL IWSG DAY QUESTION:

Have any of your readers ever responded to your writing in a way that you didn’t expect? If so, did it surprise you?

When I took my first on-line writing course, which seems centuries ago, I learned something about writing I didn’t expect. Within our six lessons, we were limited to a paragraph. Sometimes a page.

I had to edit my thoughts right down to the bone and chose each word carefully. It proved that words came at a cost.

As a group, we’d give feedback on each submission. I was hit with questions like: Where and when am I? Who’s talking? Or the worst: I don’t see anything.

My word choices seemed so obvious to me weren’t communicating clear images to my readers. I sensed something weird was going on, and it had nothing to do with my limited word count.

Why were my readers experiencing things that weren’t on the page, and how could I fix it?

I tried adding concrete details and letting the work rest. But as hard as I tried, they still saw something else.

Truth

No matter how much work a writer puts into a scene it will appear in a reader’s mind as something slightly different. Proofing our craft is art and each of us adds a little of themselves as we read.

What about you: Any feedback surprise you in your early days of writing? Care to share.

IWSG 82: Taking Chances


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This post was written for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group where we share our encouragement or insecurities on the first Wednesday of the month, to join the group or find out more click here.

~~~oOo~~~

Co-Hosts

PK Hrezo | Pat GarciaSE White | Lisa Buie Collard | Diane Burton

OPTIONAL IWSG DAY QUESTION:

Are you a risk-taker when writing? Do you try something radically different in style/POV/etc. or add controversial topics to your work?

Yes, my style and voice changes with each story, and I’ve been known to discuss controversial topics within my work.

That said, one of my favorite things to practice is third-person omnipotent point of view. If anyone wants to give this a try, you must read this post from Scribophile. It really puts it in perspective. 😉

When giving third-person omnipotent point of view a try, it can get pretty ugly. I don’t hold back and often paint myself into a corner. It can be a slog to revise and more than once I’ve lost interest in a piece because I landed up stomping through the paint to escape.

My only compensation for all my hard work is I keep them short, and I tell myself that what I’ve learned is in there somewhere and once assimilated; it will come out in organically—eventually.

In Other News: ProWritingAid is doing a Crime Writing Week this month. Here’s the webinar link if you’re curious: https://prowritingaid.com/crimeweekhub.

Hope to see you there.

What’s the best thing you’ve learned and tried in your writing?

IWSG 81: You Are What You Read–apparently


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This post was written for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group where we share our encouragement or insecurities on the first Wednesday of the month, to join the group or find out more click here.

~~~oOo~~~

Co-Hosts

Sarah – The Faux Fountain Pen Jacqui MurrayChemist KenVictoria Marie LeesNatalie AguirreJQ Rose

OPTIONAL IWSG DAY QUESTION:

Everyone has a favorite genre or genres to write. But what about your reading preferences? Do you read widely or only within the genre(s) you create stories for? What motivates your reading choice?

I have a feeling I’m going to sound like everyone else this month. You probably read as much or more than I do.

I read everything from how-to-write manuals to the classics and everything in between.

I spent a few months reading Terry Pratchett’s Discworld. All the stories were inspirational and hilarious. Moved on to Jane Austen and Charles Dickens.

Note: Since the classics were free to read, I downloaded them from Project Gutenberg: Free eBooks. They focus on older works for which the copyright has expired.

Then after the classics I jumped into an Atwood trilogy, and that’s where I’ve been living for the last few days.

So I’ve broken away from my usual favorite mysteries by Janet Evanovich, JD Robb, Michael Connelly, James Patterson to name a few. This may mean I’m growing, but don’t count on it. I’m still a child at heart.

I did tons of reading my courses through my local library. They ranged from Writing Effective Web content to Romance Writing. All interesting, but I went too fast, and now I feel I need to stop and revisit each course. This time I’ll take a long hard look and do each exercise with more enthusiasm than just trying to get it done.

And just to add a bit of spice to the mix I attended Fantasy Week Webinar through ProWritingAid and watched several FREE videos which were educational and really fun. Apparently they are doing another called Crime Week sometime in April if you’re interested.

It’s no wonder I don’t write much and when I do I never know where to start. Kidding, actually. I think I’m finally getting a handle on things. What about you, where to do you land in your reading world, and how do you nourish it?

IWSG 80: Hope in the Publishing Industry


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This post was written for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group where we share our encouragement or insecurities on the first Wednesday of the month, to join the group or find out more click here.

~~~oOo~~~

CO-HOSTS

Louise – Fundy Blue | Jennifer Lane | Mary Aalgaard | Patsy Collins at Womagwriter | Nancy Gideon

OPTIONAL IWSG DAY QUESTION:

Blogging is often more than just sharing stories. It’s often the start of special friendships and relationships. Have you made any friends through the blogosphere?

This is going to be short. I keep wondering if I should go back to writing for personal enjoyment and leave the industry to the masters.

It’s not the pain of rejection, surprisingly enough. It’s the combo of the stress of submission, almost constant rejection and my partial success.

Being published years ago then making into a recent anthology only to be dropped because there were not enough high quality submissions.

If there is a crack, I seem to find it.

I need someone to hold up a flashlight in this damn dark tunnel that never seems to end.

Is it worth it? Share some success from yesterday, last week or even ten years ago. Tell me there is a light at the end and I just need to take one more step to see it as you do.