Tag Archives: Insecure Writers Support Group

IWSG 76: The Working Writer


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This post was written for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group where we share our encouragement or insecurities on the first Wednesday of the month, to join the group or find out more click here.

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CO-HOSTS

Jemima Pett | Beth Camp|Beverly Stowe McClure | Gwen Gardner

OPTIONAL IWSG DAY QUESTION:

When you think of the term working writer, what does that look like to you? What do you think it is supposed to look like? Do you see yourself as a working writer or aspiring or hobbyist, and if latter two, what does that look like?

THE WORKING WRITER…

I know what I think, but often that is so off kilter that I thought I’d better do an internet search to find out the rest of the world thinks.

Then I’ll argue my point of view as skewed as it is. *snort*

One website post suggested that anyone could determine if they were a writer if they read the ten suggested titles and stuck to a routine. Newbies drink this Kool-Aid—and they aren’t wrong—because we all know that the more we write the better we get.

But does that make us a working writer?

Chances are pretty good that you’re telling stories for other people to read and enjoy. If that’s true, then the bare bones truth is that you need to start thinking of yourself as not only an artist — but a business person.

Every writer owns a small business. We’re all start-ups.

From Medium.com

Fine, if we produce something we can sell, we could call ourselves a small business. Does that earn anyone the title of working writer?

I don’t think it’s as simple as that.

However, I do agree that dragging something out of our imaginations and making it available for others to consume is being an artist.

FROM WRITER UNBOXED:

If you write, you are a writer. That’s pretty much how the definition works.

And you are a working writer.

The type of work you do, writing-related or otherwise, does not make you more or less legitimate. Starving does not make you better.

What It Means to Be a Working Writer, March 4, 2019, By Greer Macallister

I wholeheartedly agree with Greer. People work in the home. They work in the yard. Not many determine if their work is of value by being paid. Raise a child. Mow the lawn. They simply have value.

The end result: a happy child playing on a nicely trimmed lawn.

I think I smell barbecue.

What was I saying?

Oh, right!

Money has nothing to do with being a working writer. Time, effort, patience, digging deep are all the sure signs of what a working writer is all about. Writing is hard work. Putting down a sentence that means something is hard work.

Actually finishing a story—short or long—is hard work.

So if you ever wonder if you are a working writer, look at what you’ve accomplished in your writing career. Reread some of your work.

Remember: Not everyone can do what you do, but almost everyone can mow a lawn.

What do you think? Are you a working writer?

Gleaned from:

IWSG 74: Well, I Learned Something New


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This post was written for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group where we share our encouragement or insecurities on the first Wednesday of the month, to join the group or find out more click here.

~~~oOo~~~

Co-Hosts

Susan Baury Rouchard | Nancy Gideon | Jennifer Lane | Jennifer Hawes | Chemist Ken  | Chrys Fey

Quote:

“Although I have written a short story collection, the form found me and not the other way around. Don’t write short stories, novels or poems. Just write your truth and your stories will mold into the shapes they need to be.”

 Note: If you know, please, tell me who said this. I would like to give them credit where credit is due.

OPTIONAL IWSG DAY QUESTION:

Have you ever written a piece that became a form, or even a genre, you hadn’t planned on writing in? Or do you choose a form/genre in advance?

Honestly, I didn’t know I wrote speculative fiction until someone told me. Then I said, “Nah, I write fantasy, some sci-fi and a touch of horror. All of them with a murrrrderrrrr.”

Well, didn’t my face turn red when I looked up spec fic and discovered they nailed it and I was a silly ignoramus.

So living life, I learn a few things. It’s okay with me. I just feel a little bad about how I treat the people that teach me my lessons. Sometimes I wish I listened more, or would just “Shut it!”—if you know what I mean.

Thanks for excusing me last month and as Tobey MaGuire said in Spider-Man:

“I’m back, I’m back… Oh my back, my back.”

Now, that’s a quote. hehehe

What about you, ever learn anything from someone sharing a random thought? Where did it take you? I’d love to know. 🙂

IWSG 73: Psst! I have a Secret


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This post was written for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group where we share our encouragement or insecurities on the first Wednesday of the month, to join the group or find out more click here.

~~~oOo~~~

Co-Hosts

 Pat Garcia | J.Q. Rose | Natalie Aguirre

OPTIONAL IWSG DAY QUESTION:

Writers have secrets! What are one or two of yours, something readers would never know from your work?

I tend to be an open book. No pun intended.

One thing that may not be obvious is I’ve got a terrible memory. It comes in handy when rereading or rewatching something. Sometimes I go through the whole thing before I realize I’d been there before.

Sounds like a laugh until I try to remember where I added a detail, or if I added a detail in a chapter?

Not so much fun for a writer when they spend just as much time rereading their work as writing new pages.

Out of self-defense I started using Scrivener.

Some say they don’t have time to learn how to use it. I hear that. But since I’ve gone through the tutorial several times and I think have mastered it. I save so much time.

Some say that they don’t want to stop and collect data to save in different files. Okay. To each, their own. But the five to ten minutes I do use to file away data on characters, settings, and items, saved me hours of looking and finding that stupid detail I was sure was in chapter two and I find in chapter nine.

A place for everything and everything in its place. Whoot!

A quick click I can check eye color or the type of drapes in someone’s house without reading pages and pages. Where did I leave the clue and who has it now?

Using Scrivener has given me hours of writing time which to me is a huge success.

Anyone use Scrivener or have tips to help them remember details? Please share. All of us want to know your tricks of the trade.

IWSG 72: Breaking Through


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This post was written for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group where we share our encouragement or insecurities on the first Wednesday of the month, to join the group or find out more click here.

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OPTIONAL IWSG DAY QUESTION:

Do you have any rituals that you use when you need help getting into the ZONE? Care to share?

Co-Hosts

Feather Stone | Beverly Stowe McClure | Mary Aalgaard | Kim Lajevardi | and Chemist Ken

There is always a moment when the words stop and I can almost see them beyond a glass barrier trying to break through.

I’m sure you know the moment. It’s when the movie your recording pauses, or when the scene ends and a new one begins, or when you have to go somewhere you’ve never been before.

The last one is the hardest for me.

To get to where I must go, I close my eyes and see the glass barrier. Then I imagine a hammer—mine’s small and silver—and I tap the barrier softly. It cracks. Slowly the cracks grow and the shards fall away.

Usually it’s slow going and I have to repeat the process. Knocking down that invisible wall. It’s what I did during my first year winning Nano. The words weren’t coming. I needed to make my word count, so I broke my barrier.

And again when I wrote my first murder scene. Some might say it wasn’t real. The not so funny thing was it seemed pretty real to me and horrific.

I still do my ritual when I have to write something that I find hard to face, t00 real, or beyond my usual realm.

What about you. Is there a place you hate going but write about it anyway? How do you mange it?

IWSG 71: Don’t Drink the Kool-Aid


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This post was written for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group where we share our encouragement or insecurities on the first Wednesday of the month, to join the group or find out more click here.

~~~oOo~~~

OPTIONAL IWSG DAY QUESTION:

Each month, from all over the globe, we are a united group sharing our insecurities, our troubles, and our pain. So, in this time when our world is in crisis with the covid-19 pandemic, our optional question this month is: how are things in your world?

Co-Hosts

Diane BurtonJH Moncrieff | Anna @ Elements of Emaginette | Karen @ Reprobate Typewriter | Erika Beebe  | Lisa Buie-Collard!

I started to write another post all positive and sparkly, then my sister texted me and not for the first time. Here’s the full reversal: the fear mongering, gossip, and death threats are ridiculous in my world. I feel myself folding under the enormous pressure of speculation and stupidity.

I’m not saying don’t be careful. All of us need to use diligence.

Here are my numbers and no doubt they’ll be different when you read this:

Canada: British Columbia: Population 5 million

covid-19 Pandemic as of 2020 03 31

      • Active Cases: 435
      • Recovered: 606
      • Deceased: 25

When you compare them to the numbers worldwide, what do you think? Right, me too. For the few of us that haven’t lost someone, can we please stop freaking out?

The flood gates will break in BC soon enough and the only way we can fight back is by social distancing.

Stop Panicking

Being upset doesn’t keep us safe. I know emotions can come on really, really strong. I have them too. As someone with depression, I get it. Strong emotions make me careless; and worse, I live in a black hole blind to everyone else.

Not thinking straight will be our undoing worldwide, and we can’t afford to make a mistake. Our friends and family are depending on us.

We’ve been following these rules (if they’ll  help):

  • Stay 10 feet (3.05 metres) away when talking to anyone.
  • Wash your hands or use sanitizer.
  • Don’t touch your face.
  • Wash your doorknobs and fridge handle regularly.
  • Stay at home, without visitors.
  • Contact friends and family through email, text, etc.
  • Buy gas at the pump.
  • Buy food and supplies (when possible) online.
  • Go out only if you must.

I’m going to take a chance that I’m not the only one facing constant bombardment with warnings and testimony about a friend of a friend of mine.

Sorry for the rant, I really am, but I’ve had enough. Try not to drink their frigging Kool-Aid.

Panic is our enemy; following protocols is our defence.

What have you been doing to stay calm and stay safe?